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CTE Works for America

CTE: Learning that works for America®

CTE (Career Technical Education) is helping our nation address key challenges—from workforce development to student achievement, from economic vitality to global competitiveness. With more than 14 million students nationwide (1), CTE programs in high schools and postsecondary institutions are leading change, transforming expectations and making a difference by:

  • Developing a skilled, sustainable workforce that is well prepared for the high-demand, high-skill and high-paying jobs of today and tomorrow.

  • Improving the educational experience for millions of students in high school and college, providing an engaging, relevant education that reduces dropout rates and improves student achievement.

  • Helping students discover the wide range of career options available to them—and chart the most effective and efficient educational pathways through high school and postsecondary education for optimum value and success.

  • Working directly with business and industry to ensure that CTE programs are developing people with the skills, credentials and technical knowledge necessary to keep America on the leading edge of innovation and global competitiveness.

CTE is Learning that works for America ®: employers, community leaders, economic development professionals, schools and colleges, policy makers, students, parents, and local economies. For all of us, CTE is having a profound and positive impact on America.

At this time 49 states and the District of Columbia have adopted the CTE: Learning that Works for America ® logo. Only NASDCTEc member states are eligible to use the state logos.

USER AGREEMENT and User's Guide

So, help the CTE community share this important message by using the CTE: Learning that Works for America logo in your advocacy efforts. Please sign the USER AGREEMENT and gain access to the logo and other campaign materials.

CTE: Learning that works for America ® User's Guide
The CTE brand is a registered trademark of NASDCTEc. This guide is intended for the express purpose of providing authorized users with the implementation guidelines, graphic standards and understanding necessary to build and sustain a strong, consistent image and messaging for the CTE brand, its brand story and its value proposition.

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Did you know?

  • CTE works for higher graduation rates. The average high school graduation rate for students concentrating in CTE programs is 90.18 percent compared to a national graduation rate of 74.9 percent. (2)

  • CTE works for America’s jobs of tomorrow. Experts project 47 million job openings in the decade ending 2018. About one-third of those jobs will require an associate’s degree or certificate, and nearly all will require real-world skills that can be mastered through CTE. (3)

  • CTE works to reduce high school drop out rates. High-risk students are 8 to 10 times less likely to drop out in 11th or 12th grades if they are enrolled in a CTE program compared to general education. (4)

  • CTE works for post-secondary placement. Seventy percent of students concentrating in CTE areas stayed in post-secondary education or transferred to a four-year degree program. That compared to an overall average state target of 58 percent. (5)

Discover more!

Discover more about CTE—and how you can get involved—by visiting these and other areas on our website. You can also find CTE information and promotional materials in our Product Store.

(1) U.S. Department of Education, Office of Vocational and Adult Education, Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006, Report to Congress on State Performance, Program year 2007-2008. Washington, D.C.

(2) U.S. Department of Education, Office of Vocational and Adult Education, Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006, Report to Congress on State Performance, Program year 2007-2008. Washington, D.C.

(3) Georgetown Center on Eduation and the Workforce via Harvard’s Pathways to Prosperity report, p. 29, http://cew.georgetown.edu/jobs2018/

(4) Kulik, James, Curriculum Tracks and High School Vocational Studies (Ann Argbor: University of Michigan, 1998)

(5) U.S. Department of Education, http://www2.ed.gov/about/reports/annual/2010report/fy2010-appr.pdf